Haswell

Deals more with focusing on reading the students writing from a different perspective and talking about holistic assessment. (More internal? Less external based? Localized, rather than standardized)

The math is VERY hard to figure out.

Huot

Thinks that teachers need to constantly reevaluate their own thinking and methods of assessment and consider themselves critically as readers, rather than simply as graders and assessors. He also focuses on the fact that they need to continue researching and research assessment in order to remain relevant.

Carter

The story of Anna: Whole last part of third chapter,

“work against the act of politicizing the act of literary development” (10) Quoting Kassner

“A&M Commerce describes basic writers as those who have failed either the reading or writing portions” (11) You can not get more objective than that, it’s institutionally that they become basic writers.

“The Way Literacy Lives is based in part on our basic writing program, which is designed to help learners (1) recognize “other,” “vernacular,” or “marginalized” literacies as valid so they can begin to (2) draw from them as they learn what it means to write for college audiences – audiences far less unified or predictable than the literacy-as-universal-standard model allows.

The theoretical framework for this book relies on three, overlapping theoretical traditions: the New Literacy Studies (NLS), activity theory, and critical literacy” (16)

The idea of rhetorical dexterity – increasingly complex rhetorical situations Feminist-critical-left-wing pedagogist Really pushed a politically entrenched pedagogy, causes negative response from students. Another professor who defines the assignment differently (using service learning) also failed on a similar assignment.

Therefore needs to take some politics out of the classroom, and aim more towards meeting the students goals and expectations than her own goals and expectations in order to help see each student as literate.

Refers to Haswell, Huot, Shaugnessy, Rose, Bartolamae (Inventing the University)