• By making the choice to leave out her “personal, liberal political agenda” is still a choice that identifies her “personal, liberal political agenda.” Our group thinks that Carter does impose her political agenda on her students in the beginning, but as all teachers, you see the error of your ways. She started to realize her mistakes and made changes to eliminate them. She situated her students’ literacies to include their life outside of the classroom. But without realizing it she ignored the very literacies she was trying to emphasize.
    • Critical consciousness - awareness of existing power structures involved in teaching literacy. “the goals was to develop critical consciousness among those writers I believed to be constructed as “oppressed” and thus in need of liberation through critically aware literacy education” (23). Paulo Friere “The point of of composition instruction, including...”
    • Power - Patricia Bizzell There is not just one form of power: coercion - tell them what to do, persuasion - talk you into my perspective, authority - student doesn’t believe your liberal agenda plays the game to reach his best interest...There is always the implied power that the teacher has over the classroom
    • Autonomous literacy - assumption that oppresses...traditional literacy, literacy that students think that they need. Shapes both of these literacies (public discourse and what students think they need)...literacy exists in a vacuum...”replacing the autonomous model of literacy with an ideological one” (23). “assumes the symbols chosen should represent the world” thus reading becomes a matter of decoding this representation of the world as it has been accurately represented by the writer and writing becomes a matter of determining how to most clearly and persuasively communicate this representation to readers” (39). Jacqueline J. Royster
    • False consciousness - Patricia Bizzell quote of 49 - skeptical that "teaching academic discourse [can actually] teach a critical consciousness in students" (49)
  • The conflict of wanting the students to reach the end of an complex and developed idea of literacy that she intended her students to achieve in the classroom, while still having them reach their personal ideas of what literacy means to them. One other challenge that is teachers face is figuring out what level of literacy the students reach their classroom with. The idea that the students need to be fixed from their current state of “wrong” is demeaning and discouraging. There is little room for the student to grow when they are placed under such a low bar of expectations.