Texas A&M University – Corpus Christi
University Core Curriculum Program, Fall 2012
UCCP 1101.140, 141, 144: First-Year Seminar
Triad B: The Globtrekkers

Instructor Name: Ms. Chelsea Perez
Office Location: FC 115A
Office Phone: TBD
Office Hours: MW 10-11 AM, T 2-4 PM
Email Address: Chelsea.Perez@tamucc.edu
Course Website: http://www.tamucc.edu/wiki/ChelseaPerez/Home

Course Information:
UCCP 1101.140 | TR 8-8:50 AM | OCNR 132
UCCP 1101.141 | TR 12:30-1:20 PM | OCNR 132

Course Description
UCCP 1101, First-Year Seminar I, is an important part of Triad B. This first-year learning community—especially the seminar—is designed to help you achieve success, academically and socially, as you make the transition from high school to the university.

This seminar will challenge you to engage in significant learning in college-level intellectual work. You will develop your skills to work productively in small groups. To develop your critical thinking skills and your information literacy, you will learn how to examine problems and questions from multiple perspectives.

Course Objectives
The primary objectives of First Year Seminar are for students to:
• Explore the interconnections among the Triad/Tetrad courses;
• Develop critical thinking skills and significant learning;
• Clarify personal values, goals, and strengths;
• And develop the ability to learn through study, discussion, writing, cooperation, and collaboration

Student Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
• Students will apply interdisciplinary knowledge to address and analyze real-world issues
• Students will interpret and evaluate various research materials and/or perspectives

Required texts:
• There is no required textbook for Seminar, technically speaking. However, since you are enrolled in Sociology, you will sometimes need that textbook for my Seminar class for reviews and reading/writing workshops.

Other necessities:
• Access to University Network and an active islander email account.
• Everyone in my course will create & use a DropBox? account. It’s free and easy to use.
• USB drive to save and transport computer files between home, class, and/or labs.
SandDollar? card for checking out items from the Bell Library as well as printing in the Bell Library, computer labs, or Campus Copies in the University Center. Please note: COPIES COST $$$.

Evaluation

PORTFOLIOS and REFLECTIONS – 25%
There will be a reflection and a Portfolio for this course. The Mid-semester reflection will be worth 10% of your grade and DUE ON 10/18/2012. The final portfolio will be DUE ON 11/20/2012. Details on each will be explained in class and be posted online.

PARTICIPATION AND ATTENDANCE – 30%
It is vital that you attend each and every class. There is nothing that we will do in here that is not important to your success in this triad. To encourage attendance, I will be taking up something from you (daily writings, quizzes, group tasks) every time we meet. Any absence in this course could potentially negatively affect your final participation and attendance grade.

LEARNING COMMUNITY ASSIGNMENTS – 20%
Most of the work we will do in this course will relate to your other courses in the learning community. To reward and encourage success on learning community assignments and projects, will also count for credit in your First-Year Seminar course. There are four learning communities assignments (5% each) that will count in Seminar and in lecture. These will be discussed as the semster progresses and include: The Sociological Imagination, Hunting and Gathering, Social Stratification, and Investigating the Developing World.

EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING ASSIGNMENT- 20%

There is an experiential component to this learning community. You will be participating in a “Norm Busting” project. Details are forthcoming and will be posted on the wiki. DUE 10/9/12 .

FIRST-YEAR CELEBRATION- 5%

All students will attend and participate in the FYC on 11/29/12.

Online Schedule A detailed schedule for this course can be found at: http://www.tamucc.edu/wiki/ChelseaPerez/Home

Late Work
I do not typically accept late work. Please meet with me or notify me 24 hours in advance if you feel you have an extenuating circumstance. Do not expect that I’ll take your late work, though: I review late submissions on a case-by-case basis. In-class work and attendance cannot be made up.

Electronic Device Policy
Please respect my wishes to create a peaceful learning environment:
• Refrain from the use of electronic devices during class (iPods, cell/iPhones, etc).
• Switch your cell phone to silent (NOT VIBRATE) before class begins.
• English courses meet in a computer lab, so computers are always present. For Seminar students, laptops are only permitted for certain class days. I will note it on my class plans.
• Emergencies/unexpected situations do arise. If you are experiencing a situation where you need your phone or are expecting an urgent phone call, notify me before class begins and exit the classroom quietly if you need to take a call.
• Remove headphones during class unless given permission to use them.
• You can and will be asked to leave class if you are consistently disruptive and/or violate these rules.

Academic Honesty
University students are expected to conduct themselves in accordance with the highest standards of academic honesty. Academic misconduct for which a student is subject to penalty includes all forms of cheating, such as illicit possessions of examinations or examination materials, forgery, or plagiarism.

Notice to Students with Disabilities
The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please call or visit Disability Services at (361) 825-5816 in Driftwood 101. If you are a returning veteran and are experiencing cognitive and/or physical access issues in the classroom or on campus, please contact the Disability Services office for assistance at (361) 825-5816.

Dropping a Class
I hope that you never find it necessary to drop this or any other class. However, events can sometimes occur that make dropping a course necessary or wise. Please consult with me before you decide to drop to be sure it is the best thing to do. Should dropping the course be the best course of action, you must initiate the process to drop the course by going to the Student Services Center and filling out a course drop form. Just stopping attendance and participation WILL NOT automatically result in your being dropped from the class. Friday, November 2 is the last day to drop a class with an automatic grade of “W” this term.

Grade Appeal Process
As stated in University Rule 13.02.99.C2, Student Grade Appeals, a student who believes that he or she has not been held to appropriate academic standards as outlined in the class syllabus, equitable evaluation procedures, or appropriate grading, may appeal the final grade given in the course. The burden of proof is upon the student to demonstrate the appropriateness of the appeal. A student with a complaint about a grade is encouraged to first discuss the matter with the instructor. For complete details, including the responsibilities of the parties involved in the process and the number of days allowed for completing the steps in the process, see University Rule 13.02.99.C2, Student Grade Appeals, and University Procedure 13.02.99.C2.01, Student Grade Appeal Procedures. These documents are accessible through the University Rules Web site at http://www.tamucc.edu/provost/university_rules/index.html. For assistance and/or guidance in the grade appeal process, students may contact the Office of Student Affairs.

Student Resources

The Center for Academic Student Achievement (CASA)
The consultants at the Writing Center invite any individual at TAMUCC who wants assistance or guidance with any type of writing project to come and meet with them. Throughout the semester, if I believe that your writing needs additional work or attention, I may suggest that you make an appointment with a consultant at the Writing Center. The Writing Center is located in the Glasscock Building 112 (GSSC 112). CASA also provides tutoring in the sciences, mathematics, history, political science, psychology, and Spanish. Visit http://casa.tamucc.edu/ for more information.
Students with Disabilities and Veterans
The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation requires that all students will disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please call or visit Disability Services at (361) 825-5816 in CCH 116 and 119.

If you are a returning veteran and are experiencing cognitive and/or physical access issues in the classroom or on campus, please contact the Disability Services office for assistance at (361) 825-5816.

University Counseling Center
We all encounter stress, problems, and difficult decisions in our daily lives. Sometimes, these problems may seem overwhelming or it might be difficult to talk about certain issues with your friends or family. The University Counseling Center is available for all students enrolled at TAMUCC. Students seek counseling for a multitude of reasons and the University Counseling Center offers individual therapy, group counseling, psychiatric services, psychological testing, consultation, outreach services, alcohol and drug education and prevention programs, and personal skills training. If you are in need of counseling services or just someone to talk to, please call or visit the University Counseling center at (361) 825-2703 in the Driftwood Building. Visit http://counseling.tamucc.edu for more information.

Academic Advising
The College of Liberal Arts requires that students meet with an Academic Advisor as soon as they are ready to declare a major. Your academic advisor will set up a degree plan, which must be signed by the student, a faculty mentor, and the department chair. The Academic Advising Center is located in Driftwood 203E, and can be reached at (361) 825-3466.